ANTONIO DE FELIPE

(July 7 – August 15, 2011)

JPEG - 436.7 kb
MULTICOLORED RACE
Acrylic on canvas, 114 x 146 cm.
MULTICOLORED RACE COCA COLA MARGARITA THE AVIGNON DRAWINGS BLACK AUDREY AGAINST A BLACK BACKGROUND AUDREY WITH PIPE AGAINST BLUE BACKGROUND MARILYN MONDRIAN WARHOL HAD MARILYN, WE HAVE SARA

ANTONIO DE FELIPE was born in Valencia, Spain (1965). He graduated from the School of Fine Arts of the Universidad de San Carlos (Valencia, Spain), where he studied from 1985 to 1990. His works are held in important collections such as those of the Museo Nacional Reina Sofía (Madrid, Spain);the Instituto Valenciano de Arte Moderno (Valencia, Spain); the Colección Carmen Thyssen-Bornemisza; and the Sydney Besthoff Foundation of New Orleans (Louisiana, USA), among others. He has presented his work in solo and collective shows at galleries and art centers in Spain, Italy, Germany, England, Norway, France, Denmark, Belgium, Sweden, Canada, and the United States. He has also participated in important art fairs such as Arco, Art Cologne, Art Paris, Art Brussels, St-Art Strasbourg, and O Kiaf (Korea International Art Fair), all important reference points for the latest artistic trends. In the selection of works on display, De Felipe presents a series of paintings made using acrylic on canvas. In them, the artist reviews, among other themes, over half a century of the pop movement, with the typical artistic irony that characterizes the oeuvre of this Spanish painter. In the midst of the advertising-based imaginary proposed by the artist, there arises a kind of questioning—art and advertising? The sacred icons of art history are involved in the not-so-innocent world of advertising, taking on a connotation that renders them simultaneously subliminal and exquisitely perverse. A trip through or overview of twenty years of the artist’s career, including some of the most important and representative paintings of his prolific oeuvre. Javier Rubio Nomblot comments on his work: “In the early works by Antonio de Felipe—the Logotipos (Logotypes) series, begun in 1992—the advertising icon appeared transcribed literally and meticulously. As a result, the work seemed not to offer any message whatsoever. The ‘advertisement’ and the ‘brand,’ transmuted into painting and reimplanted in the artistic circuit, completely lost all significance, cleaned of ‘impurities,’ leaving only the naked image empty of all extra-pictorial meaning, as also happens in the creations of Rotella: ‘Precisely because the image no longer serves its advertising purpose, it no longer communicates anything; it may be seen as an image and valued as an aesthetic fact.’ But like all implants, a certain reaction of rejection occurred: once situated in the museum or gallery, those familiar motifs seemed to try to return to their place of origin, as if seeking out that lost ‘advertising function,’ their original function. (…) Without a doubt, the element that most helps to temper the radical nature of his work is the constant reference to art history (a history also reviewed, with candor and optimism, in which nothing seems to bother the artist, itself an infrequent event). But it should be noted that this act of ‘sweetening’ is more apparent than real. After all, how are we supposed to react to Coca-Cola, Kleenex, Koipesol bottles, petit-suisses, and other industrial byproducts gliding through the paintings of Velázquez, Van Gogh, Ingres, Picasso, and Gaugin?” (2003).